Is anastasia dating for real

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After several days, the chat pop-ups stopped arriving from women and started arriving (almost, but not quite) exclusively from women (more on this site and others in the family later), as evidenced by both the physical appearances of the women and the chat links, which were to pages in the domain.

For some reason, the women started addressing their messages to "Not" rather than to "Michael", presumably because I had previously registered an account "Not Real", although I'm not sure how that account/name became linked to the "Michael Michaelson" account.

Too, several of these letters (the very first contact these supposed women had had with "Michael's" profile) included such implausibly forward statements as "Do you want to regard me as your special princess in your heart forever?

", "honey, I want to have a castle with you,just you and me,will you want to be my prince? Those just don't ring true to me as the type of thing a genuine woman seeking lasting love would say to a seventy year old man she'd never met before, especially absent a photograph or any other identifying details.

Chat pop-ups for "John" didn't start as immediately as for "Michael", but once they did (after about a day), they were similarly incessant, and equally implausible.

All of the above points strongly to scamming - that deceptive letters are sent out without regard for any particular qualities of their recipients (other than having money to spend).

The site, which I won't link to, because I don't want to improve its search ranking, is asiandate.com, also operating under the domain aliases (i.e.

Within two days, the account received 15 letters, with similar results as for "Michael" - many of the writers claimed to have read, and to be attracted to "John" based on, his profile; many of them provided more than one photograph.

So, about 70% of the first 23 letters I opened either by a charitable interpretation blatantly or implicitly lied, and/or, by a more likely interpretation, attempted to scam "Michael" by flattering him and pretending interest only so that he would spend money (between and a pop) to read and reply to future letters.

That's not to say that the remaining 30% were not scammers, and, indeed, the style of their letters was very similar.

In any case, the frequency of the pop-ups didn't abate - if anything, it increased.

There were pretty much constantly at least one and often around five chat pop-up windows on the screen at a time.

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