New york times dating violence

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The levels of dating violence against men has not been investigated to the same extent.

According to the Centers for Disease Control National Intimate Partner Violence Survey results of 2010, 1 in 6 women (15.2%) have been stalked during their lifetime, compared to 1 in 19 men (5.7%).

The simple tally of physical acts is typically found to be similar in those studies that examine both directions, but some studies show that male violence may be more serious.

Male violence may do more damage than female violence; A research article published in the Journal of Family Psychology, "Estimating the Number of American Children Living in Partner-Violent Families", says that contrary to media and public opinion women commit more acts of violence than men in eleven categories: throw something, push, grab, shove, slap, kick, bite, hit or threaten a partner with a knife or gun.

The results were the same even when the most severe episodes of violence were analyzed.

At least one out of every three women around the world has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in her lifetime with the abuser usually someone known to her.

Additionally, 1 in 3 bisexual women (37%) and 1 in 6 heterosexual women (16%) have experienced stalking victimization in their lifetime during which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed.

While domestic violence crosses all socio-economic classes, Intimate Terrorism (IT) is more prevalent among poor people.

When evaluating situational couple violence, poor people, subject to greater strains, have the highest percentage of situational couple violence, which does not necessarily involve serious violence.

Regarding ethnicity, socio-economic standing and other factors often have more to do with rates of domestic violence.

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